Q

Exchange rerouting and configuration issues

I have completed the my migration from Exchange 5.5 to Exchange 2000 and have finished almost everything except for the rerouting of outgoing internet e-mail and the removal of the last 5.5 server.

I was told by someone much more knowledgable than I that I could get around installing an SMTP Connector in Exchange...

2000 by simply configuring the Default SMTP Virtual server's external DNS addresses to point to my ISP's DNS servers. Which is the way I had it setup on my Exchange 5.5 server. Are there any potential problems with doing it this way?

I also wanted to ask about the removal of the Exchange 5.5 IMS connector. According to knowledgebase article Q316886, all I have to do to reroute the outgoing mail is to delete the IMS and then make sure that the connection agreement in the ADC replicates the change. This seems a bit simple to me. Does this mean that with the IMS gone my Exchange 2000 server will automatically know to look at the Default SMTP Virtual server for outgoing delivery.

Yes, you could get away without an SMTP Connector in your Exchange 2000 (or 2003) environment. The SMTP Virtual Server provides the base functionality you need to send and receive SMTP messages. However, without an SMTP Connector, each Exchange server would send messages directly to the Internet. By installing a first SMTP Connector, the Link State Routing Table tells each other server that there is a 'specified' route out of the system to the Internet. The SMTP Virtual Servers on each Exchange server will no longer send directly to the Internet. From a routing point of view, this is probably what you want. You will also find that you have more control over an SMTP Connector if needed. This simplifies your second question. When the IMS is gone, there will only be one path out from your Exchange system to the Internet, through your new SMTP Connector. You could also make the cost of your IMS higher than the SMTP Connector as a first step, thereby preserving the ability to revert if necessary.
This was last published in March 2004

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